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Drezdenko

Polska / lubuskie

Synagogues, prayer houses and others Cemeteries Sites of martyrdom Judaica in museums Andere

Summary

Province:lubuskie / inne (before 1939)
County:strzelecko-drezdenecki / Friedeberg (before 1939)
Community:Drezdenko / Driesen (before 1939)
Other names:Drizina
Drecen,Drczen
Drdzen
Drzeń
Drżeń
Driesen [j.niemiecki],
 
GPS:
52.8379° N / 15.8315° E
52°50'16" N / 15°49'53" E

Location

Izrael Badacz

Drezdenko | Marcin Wygocki

The town of Drezdenko is situated in the Strzelce-Drezdenko District, Lubuskie Province. It has a population of 10.4 thousand (2004) and lies on the Noteć River on the border of the Wielkopolskie and Pomorskie Lake Districts.

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History

Małgorzata Grzenda

Budynek synagogi w Drezdenku (ul. Poniatowskiego) | nieznany

Drezdenko is located approximately 31 miles (50 kilometers) east of Gorzów Wielkopolski (Landsberg). A small Orthodox Jewish community is known to have existed there with a population of about 170 people in the 1890s, which meant that Jews constituted about 4 percent of the whole town’s populace. In the 1930s, however, this number decreased to a mere 85 inhabitants, all of whom eventually left the town and emigrated mostly to Palestine. The Jewish Community in Drezdenko had its own cemetery and a synagogue, which was consecrated in 1767.

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Local history

Izrael Badacz

Drezdenko | Marcin Wygocki

Drezdenko was first mentioned in 1092, but the most important documents proving the existence of the settlement come from 1233. Most probably Drezdenko was a castellany as early as 1251. In 1252 it was incorporated into Wielkopolska. In 1266, together with Santok, it became the target of the raid by the Brandenburg Knights. Both settlements were burnt as a result of the treaty concluded between Boloeslaw Pobozny (the Pious) and Duke Otto. In the 12th century Drezdenko was incorporated into Brandenburg. In 1317 the settlement was granted a town charter – it became the property of the von der Ost family. In 1356 Drezdenko became the Polish fief. In 1405 it was invaded by the Teutonic Knights who forced the von der Ost family to sell the castle. King Wladyslaw Jagiello accused the Teutonic order of the annexation of Drezdenko then. The ongoing disputes added to the outbreak of the Polish- Teutonic war 1409 – 1411. In 1455 the town was sold to Frrderick II. It was the time of German rule and town development. In 1600 the salt-works was opened. Moreover, Drezdenko coins (groshen) were minted for the needs of trade with Poland. In the years 1603 – 1605 a stronghold was built in Drezdenko. In 1622 the town was destroyed by the fire and in 1637 it was raided by the Swedish forces, which caused a total destruction of the town. Also the outbreak of 7 epidemics in the years 1758 – 1866 added to the devastation of the town. In the 2nd half of the 18th century Drezdenko was rebuilt, but it was seized a few times by the Russian and Prussian forces, which fought against each other during the Seven Years’ War. During the Napoleonic Wars the area in the vicinity of Drezdenko was seized for a short time by the French army. In the years 1812 – 1819 the Citizens’ Guard was appointed in the town which helped maintain public order. Moreover, a new school building was erected and the principal office of the town’s authorities was moved to the new town hall. A hospital and prison were made available to the public as well. Apart from the building mentioned before, the municipal slaughterhouse was established, the court building was completed and numerous roads were constructed. Moreover, a ceramic factory was started up as well as a match factory and two saw mills. In 1831 and 1855 the town was struck by an epidemic of cholera. In 1871

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