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Translator name :drtlukasiewicz

First Jews settled in Bobolice in 1717, although the fee of 6 thalers for settling in town was already established in 1712. Some records form 1717 mention that David Salomon from Złotów (Flatow) lived there temporarily together with five other Jews. As the situation in Poland was very unstable, they searched refuge in Bobolice. Salomon applied to get a permit to settle in Szczecinek (Neustettin) at that time. Since 1728 Michael Fischelm who paid 19 thalers and 4 groschen for the protection of the stated, lived in Bobolice. Even though he did not have a “good certificate”, as the report “Über das Judenwesen in Hinterpommern” (“Jewish Population in West Pomerania”) from 1731 put it, he was granted privileges on October 28th ,1718 for the price of 41 thalers. In 1737 seven people lived in Fischel's household - he, his wife, his sons David and Mendel, his daughter Maria and two servants. He had one more son and daughter although they lived in Poland. In the 1750s there were already 14 Jews living in Bobolice- their names are mentioned in the book[1.1]. In 1764 they paid a fee of 25 thalers and 12 groshen for protection. There was a list of Pomeranian Jews who “in return for protection were obliged to sell goods from the local factory for a certain price abroad" then. Jacob Moses from Bobolice was on this list, as well. As it was stated on a receipt from April 22nd 1767, he paid 600 thalers to the government in Berlin. When in 1779 Israel Salomon, a Jew living in Karlino (Körlin), wanted to marry Henne Isaac from Bobolice, he had to accept wool from the government and export china in return of their permission. According to data, there were 22 Jews living in Bobolice in 1782 and two years later 25. As it happened in other Pomeranian towns, exclusive right to trade amber was passed on to a Jewish merchant. In 1785 the government in Berlin rejected a request of the Bobolice merchants to forbid Jews to trade in paper, gunpowder, scrap metal and white and blue starch. They reasoned their decision stating that “neither a union of merchants, nor a guild is entitled to exclusive trade of those goods”. This was a regulation issued by Pommersche Kammer (Pomerania Chamber). In 1807-1812 the magistrate was about to bring an action against Jews form Bobolice not affiliated in a union. After 1810 the number of Jews living in the town increased, mainly because Jews from West Prussia and from other Pomeraniam towns settled there. [1.2]. In 1812 21 Jewish families lived in Bobolice - 51 people altogether. Four years later the number grew to 77 and in 1831 up to 139. Accoridng to statistics, Bobolice reached the highest number of Jewish inhabitants in 1896 when there were 199 of them. Tables with names taken over by Jewish families that moved to Bobolice in 1812 and the names of those who lived in Bobolice (also temporarily) from 1815 till 1874 can be found in the book[1.3]. As the number of Jewish children had been also increasing, it was necessary to establish a school for them and to employ teachers - a special comittee was even called to deal with this problem. [1.4]. There was a charge for sending children to school - 2 thalers for a son and 40 groshen for a daughter. Between 1819 and 1873 there were 54 marriages, 281 deaths in the parish; an average birth rate was between 7 and 9 annually. When a new law was introduced in 1847, the Jewish community decided on its own statute. It was agreed upon in 1856 by the Lord Mayor of Szczecin (Stettiner Oberpräsident), count Behr-Negendank. The statute consisted of 81 articles. [1.2]. On 19th of October 1883, the statue was extended and on 12th of July 1901 a new statue, very similar to the precious one, was written. It was agreed on July 4th, 1901 by Lord Mayor of Szczecin, baron von Mackensen, as well.  It was also agreed upon by Lord Mayor, Baron von Mackensen on July 4th , 1901. In the late 19th century the number of Jewish inhabitants in Bobolice was stable and amounted to 149 people, what made up 3% of the total town population. Names of the community members deceased between 1812 and 1874 and information about their age and occupation are contained in Salinger's book [1.6]. At the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries the community's budget fluctuated between 1 400 and 1 500 marks. There were the Women Association and the Association for the Sick in the community (German: Frauen- und Krankenverein). In 1899, 160 Jews lived temporarily in Bobolice, in 1903 - about 116 but the total number started to decrease and in 1911 the community had only 75 members. Its budget did not change much. Since 1885 the kehilla had Chevra Kadisha [1.7] and Israelitischer Frauenverein [1.8], the aim of which was to support the poor. At the turn of 1924 and 1925 there were about 67 Jews living in Bobolice. In 1930, 62 Jews lived in the town, and it was 1% of total town's population. [1.9]. The community's last employee was the teacher and cantor Joachin Lachotzke (1937-1942), who simultaneously held the same post in the community in Słupsk. In 1942 he and his family were deported to the east. In the first years of national socialist rule, most of the Jewish shops and enterprises could still exist. In May 1939, there were still 14 Jews in Bobolice[1.10]. It is not known whether some of them were able to leave the town, or whether Jews from Bobolice were among those transported to the east in July 1942. In August 1942, Jews from Bobolice and from Berlin were deported to Terezin (Theresienstadt)[1.11].                                      

 

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[1.1] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 345.

[1.2] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 348

[1.3] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, p. 346, 348.

[1.4] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 346, 347, 348

[1.5] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 348

[1.6] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. IV, New York 2006, p. 893-900

[1.7] Jewish charitable and mortuary association - so-called Mortuary Fraternity which activity was to bury men

[1.8] Organization of Jewish women taking care of the needy ones and of burial of women.

[1.9] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 351

[1.10] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol II, New York 2006, p. 352

[1.11] Gerhard Salinger, Zur Erinnerung und zum Gedenken. Die einstigen jüdischen Gemeinden Pommerns, vol. II, New York 2006, p. 353

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